During this exciting weekend which is more than a history lesson, we will discuss these pioneers in detail, looking through come of @Bergborgs personal collection of historical books, we will look at and examine concepts of style and aesthetics.

We will follow and discuss around lectures about Itoh Seiu, Minomura Kou, Nureki Chimuo & Akechi Denki.

This workshop really is not to be missed by any Japanese bondage enthusiast no matter which style you are tying.

Tickets for the whole weekend including Friday and Saturday Rope Jams is £75 per person. You do not need a partner to attend this workshop, you only need partner if you wish to tie during the rope jam and separate tickets can be purchased for the rope jam only for £6.
Single tickets for Saturday are available at £45 per person which includes the rope jam on Saturday.

Schedule for the 2 days is as follows:

Friday:
19.30–20.00 Welcome Meet and Greet
20.00–22.30 Open space for tying

Saturday
10.30–13.00 Intro and Itoh Seiu Lecture (150 min)
13.00–14.00 LUNCH (60 min)
14.00–16.00 Minomura Kou Lecture (120 min)
16.00–16.30 Coffee-break / snacks (30 min)
16.30–19.00 Nureki Chimuo Part 1 Lecture (150 min)
19.00–20.30 DINNER (90 min)
20.30–23.30 Open space for tying

Sunday
10.30–13.00 Nureki Chimuo Part 2 Lecture (150 min)
13.00–14.00 LUNCH (60 min)
14.00–16.00 Akechi Denki Lecture (120 min)
16.00–16.30 Coffee-break / snacks (30 min)
16.30–18.00 Concluding remarks, Q&A (90 min)

Ticket Link Here

ITOH SEIU

The theme for the first lecture is one of the absolute pioneers of Kinbaku: Itoh Seiu (1882–1961). In addition to some biographical storytelling, giving some context for Itoh’s work, I will also make some general reflections about the uses of history in Kinbaku. We will be analysing some of Itoh’s images – both photography and artwork – and we will take some time to analyse the concept of “seme”. Accompanying the lecture will be art-books, old dirty magazines, movie-clips, plastic toys and even some original sketches by Itoh. You will also get to hear excerpts from a number of texts translated from the Japanese.

MINOMURA KOU

Minomura Kou (1920–1992) is also know under his artist name “Kita Reiko”. He had a direct influence for example on Nureki and Yukimura, indirectly clearly also on Naka – and, it could be argued, perhaps on all of us. In the early 1950s, Minomura was instrumental in the turn towards SM of the magazine Kitan Club. He was also the person behind both the tying and the texts in the first Kinbaku photo-book ever published. A key feature of his rope-scenes is an erotic dynamic involving contradictory feelings of embarrassment and enjoyment. We will have a look on his art-work, his writing and photos of his tying.

NUREKI CHIMUO

The impact of Nureki Chimuo (1930–2013) on Japanese rope culture is unique. In his role as a writer, he has also been an influential historian of this culture. Writing erotic stories in Kitan Club already in the early 1950s, Nureki grew close to Minomura Kou. For a long time, Nureki then collaborated with master photographer Sugiura Norio – together they created an original aesthetic that has come to be iconic. Nureki was also the central figure of Kinbiken, the “Society for the Study of the Beauty of Bondage” that met practically every month for 24 years (1985–2009). They produced an enormous trove of material – beautiful photos and hundreds of documentary and artistic videos, as well as more than twenty issues of an ambitious magazine. Kinbiken was also where Naka Akira discovered rope. We will have a look at the group’s activities, listen to some translated texts, and reflect on their impact.

AKECHI DENKI

“In SM, shibari is communication between two people using the medium of rope. It’s a connection made with rope between the hearts of two people.”
These words by Akechi Denki (1940–2005) have become famous – for good reasons. Akechi was a real character, a creative rope-artist and a performer. His distinctive style has also had quite some influence on the European rope-scene through the years. Indeed, Akechi was the first Japanese rope-artist that came to Europe to perform, in 1998. Through some texts where Akechi tells about his life, we will trace his itinerary from childhood and youth in a Japan defined by the war and the post-war sufferings, to his break-through as a rope-performer in the 1980s. Drawing on a wealth of materials such as texts and images from old magazines, VHS-tapes and later DVDs, we will examine the development of Akechi’s style and try to understand his outlook. “Sometimes the ropes move on their own and my hands just follow, and that is always an amazing experience. I just disappear. The shibari is always very beautiful when that happens.”

About BergBorg

You might know Bergborg from Studio Kokoro in Sweden, or his Japanese Kinbaku books blog, you can find here

He has taught this historical presentation across Europe and we’re excited to have him at Studio Kokoro (UK). Bergborg has done countless research on these pioneers of Kinbaku, based on the material presented on his blog, and independant research for unpublished works.

Studio Kokoro

We welcome all body types, genders, POC, all abilities and identities at Studio Kokoro.

Please read our Code of Conduct

We have lots of parking at the venue and good transport links, more information on amenities can be found here

The studio does not have a microwave but does have a fridge for you to store food, and a selection of hot and cold drinks.

All of our tickets can be found on the event ticket page HERE! – we try to be flexible, you can pay at the studio with cash or card, pay in instalments, purchase the deposit ticket and pay the rest later or pay in full. Contact us if you have any specific requirements.